Modernist Designers Series / Jacques Adnet

For our third modernist designer to know, we’re taking you into the heart of French art, culture, and history: Paris.

If you missed February’s featured designer, read here!

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Jacques Adnet (1900-1984)
France
Architect, Designer

Jacques Adnet and his twin brother, Jean, received their artistic education at the École des Arts Décoratifs in Paris in 1916.

Following graduation, the twins founded their own design firm, Jean & Jacques Adnet, where they would work together for the next four years.

During this period, Adnet’s work was largely inspired by the popular Art Deco style of the early era. He used it to update traditional furniture in new ways and placed heavy emphasis on materials like leather, metals, mirror, and woods.

In 1928, the brothers’ paths took different directions when Jacques Adnet accepted a directorship at the design firm La Compagnie des Arts Français. It was here that his style began to shift towards the work he is most famous for…

He continued to use luxurious materials and to reinvent traditional forms, but he began to embrace the svelte lines and shapes of modernist design.

Campaign chair and ottoman, 1940s  (   source   )

Campaign chair and ottoman, 1940s (source)

Lounge chairs, 1950  (   source   )

Lounge chairs, 1950 (source)

Coffee table with mirror, 1930s  (   source   )

Coffee table with mirror, 1930s (source)

His unique modern style continued into the 1940s, when Hermès commissioned Adnet for nearly a decade’s worth of furniture designs. Adnet’s most famous pieces include the leather mirror, Circulaire, and his table lamp, Quadro VII, which was produced in Italy.

Circulaire, round leather mirrors, 1950  (   source   )

Circulaire, round leather mirrors, 1950 (source)

Quadro VII Lamp, 1929  (   source   )

Quadro VII Lamp, 1929 (source)

Adnet also renovated and designed several high-profile interiors in the 1940s and 50s, including French President Vincent Auriol’s private apartments, Paris’s UNESCO headquarters, and several luxury ocean liners.

When La Compagnie des Arts Français closed in 1959, he resumed his work as an art school director.

More Modern Designs by Jacques Adnet

Hand-stitched leather lounge chairs, 1950s-1960s  (   source   )

Hand-stitched leather lounge chairs, 1950s-1960s (source)

Leather magazine holder designed for Hermès  (   source   )

Leather magazine holder designed for Hermès (source)

Stitched leather desk, 1950s  (   source   )

Stitched leather desk, 1950s (source)

Leather table, 1950s  (   source   )

Leather table, 1950s (source)

Keep an eye out for our next featured designer in April…

In the meantime, tell us your favorite modern designer in the comments below!

Modernist Designers Series / Clara Porset

Our featured designer for February played a strong role in expanding modernist design beyond Europe. After being exiled from her native country, she adopted a new home and forever changed the way it would see design. We had the privilege of seeing her work in person on a recent trip to Mexico City!

If you missed January’s designer, read here.

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Clara Porset (1895-1981)
Mexico (born in Cuba)
Designer

Clara Porset is credited for revolutionizing modern design in Mexico, though she didn’t start there.

Born in Cuba to a wealthy family, Porset studied at Columbia University’s School of Fine Arts, the École des Beaux Arts in Paris, as well as the Sorbonne, the Louvre, and Black Mountain College in North Carolina.

The latter is where she met Josef Albers, the former Bauhaus designer and educator famous for introducing color theory to modern design. Porset’s time with Albers would largely influence the modern forms of her future designs.

In the early 1930s, Porset attempted to return to Cuba to teach and design, but her support of the Cuban resistance led to political exile. She finally landed in Mexico, where she would spend the rest of her career and life.

Totonaca Suite, Low Chair, 1959  (   source   )

Totonaca Suite, Low Chair, 1959 (source)

To her great credit, Porset embraced Mexico’s culture and fused it with her work. She traveled around the country, soaking up its craft traditions, art, and culture. When she designed furniture, she kept the existing forms and edited out the ornate details, creating a simplified, modern take on tradition.

Her most famous designs were her new interpretations of Mexico’s butaque chair, a low, curving lounge chair with history dating back to Spanish rule.

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1940s  (   source   )

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1940s (source)

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1950  (   source   )

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1950 (source)

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1950s  (   source   )

Butaque Lounge Chair, 1950s (source)

Porset won many design awards within Mexico and received recognition from MoMA’s Organic Design for Home Furnishing contest in 1940. Several renowned architects of the age embraced her work as well, including Luis Barragán. Porset worked with Barragán personally to furnish his own home and many of his architectural projects. We’ll be sharing photos of their collaboration on the blog in the future, so stay tuned!

Porset’s lasting contribution to modern design was not only to spread it to Mexico, but also to give it a new flavor, one representative of the Mexican people themselves.


More Modern Designs by Clara Porset

Totonaca Suite, 3-Seat Sofa, 1959  (   source   )

Totonaca Suite, 3-Seat Sofa, 1959 (source)

High Armchairs  (   source   )

High Armchairs (source)

Woven Rush Folding Screen, 1950s  (   source   )

Woven Rush Folding Screen, 1950s (source)

Chairs in mahogany and cotton, 1950s  (   source   )

Chairs in mahogany and cotton, 1950s (source)

DM Nacional Desk, 1950s  (   source   )

DM Nacional Desk, 1950s (source)

Lounge chairs, 1950s  (   source   )

Lounge chairs, 1950s (source)

Keep an eye out for our next featured designer in March…

In the meantime, tell us your favorite modern designer in the comments below!

Before + After / Ayesha Curry's Homemade Pop-Up Shop

Homemade Pop-Up Shop Window.jpg

In case you haven’t heard, we had the incredible opportunity of designing Ayesha Curry’s Homemade Pop-Up Shop in Oakland’s Jack London Square! Ayesha recently relaunched her Homemade brand, and the pop-up shop was a way for her fans to experience her brand and products in real-life. We had a blast creating a retail space that embodied her vision!

You can visit the store throughout the month of February at 423 Water St, but in case you can’t make it in-person, here’s some before and after photos to show you what we accomplished in TWO WEEKS start to finish. Big thanks to partner Cost Plus World Market who provided all of the furnishings!

BEFORE: Sad white walls

BEFORE: Sad white walls

AFTER: Never underestimate the power of paint to transform!

AFTER: Never underestimate the power of paint to transform!

BEFORE: Blue walls left over from the previous tenant

BEFORE: Blue walls left over from the previous tenant

AFTER: Beautifully styled shelving and tabletops to show-off the wares

AFTER: Beautifully styled shelving and tabletops to show-off the wares

BEFORE: Depressing ceiling tiles

BEFORE: Depressing ceiling tiles

AFTER: No one’s looking at the ceiling tiles when there’s a bedroom scene this beautiful

AFTER: No one’s looking at the ceiling tiles when there’s a bedroom scene this beautiful

BEFORE: A depressing, poorly lit space

BEFORE: A depressing, poorly lit space

AFTER: A peaceful retreat while shopping

AFTER: A peaceful retreat while shopping

Looking for more? Read the short Q&A with Ayesha herself in the Rue Magazine feature.

What do you love most about this retail space transformation? Share with us in the comments below!

Modernist Designers Series / Gio Ponti

Can you believe it’s been nearly 70-80 years since the Modernist movement started? It was around the 1940s that designers and architects first embraced this style, but it wasn’t called “modernism” just yet.

Design’s shift toward clean lines, minimalism, and natural materiality took hold in interiors, furniture, ceramics, and architecture. Although each designer had his or her own unique approach, these were the features that characterized modern design over the following thirty years.

This year, we’re sharing twelve of the top masters behind this major movement — one for every month of 2019. First up:

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Giovanni (Gio) Ponti (1891-1979)
Italy
Architect, Designer, Artist

Gio Ponti was born in Milan in the late 1800s and is credited as being the most influential Italian designer of his time. Although he studied architecture at the Politecnico di Milano, his professional career began as the artistic director of the ceramics company, Richard Ginori.

There, his initial work was influenced by classicism until 1925, when he transitioned to the Art Deco and Modernist styles.

In these years, Ponti coined “forma finita,” his theory that a design is complete when nothing can be added or taken away. You can see evidence of this concept in his furniture lines, where vestiges of Art Deco’s geometric forms pave the way for modern simplicity. The resulting creative “lightness” of design is uniquely Ponti.

His other notable accomplishments include founding the still-circulating architecture and design magazine Domus in 1928, as well as designing the iconic Pirelli Tower in Milan. He is still widely revered in the industry today — we saw his work on exhibit in Paris just last November!

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Superleggera chair design for Cassina, 1957

Superleggera chair design for Cassina, 1957

Bureau Giordano Chiesa, 1953

Bureau Giordano Chiesa, 1953

Console collaboration, Gio Ponti and Paolo de Poli, 1942

Console collaboration, Gio Ponti and Paolo de Poli, 1942

Ocean Liner Armchair, Heritage Collection, 1951

Ocean Liner Armchair, Heritage Collection, 1951

Dezza armchair, 1965  (   source   )

Dezza armchair, 1965 (source)

Keep an eye out for our next featured designer in February…

In the meantime, tell us your favorite modernist designer in the comments below!

Before + After / Mission Bay Penthouse

What would you do when confronted with a nondescript white box of a condo? For our MIssion Bay Penthouse project, we transformed said condo with bold color and pattern! It’s amazing how wallpaper and paint can completely change a space and imbue personality. Read on for a few dramatic before and afters and make sure to check out the link at the bottom for all the photos from this project!

BEFORE: The living room

BEFORE: The living room

AFTER: We kept the walls white in the living room due to the plentiful sunlight, and brought in color through the furnishings.

AFTER: We kept the walls white in the living room due to the plentiful sunlight, and brought in color through the furnishings.

The only walls kept white in the condo were in the living room and kitchen! The dark entry is painted in burgundy and transitions into this bright living space filled with natural sunlight. The colorful theme is found in the furnishings instead.

BEFORE: the master bedroom

BEFORE: the master bedroom

AFTER: Blues and grays create a calm and peaceful retreat in the master bedroom.

AFTER: Blues and grays create a calm and peaceful retreat in the master bedroom.

The master bedroom is a peaceful retreat with its blue and gray color theme, and subtle yet dramatic hand-painted wallpaper. We love how the painted and wallpapered walls make the room feel bigger than before when the room had white walls.

BEFORE: The guest bedroom

BEFORE: The guest bedroom

AFTER: We created a moody guest bedroom with Farrow & Ball Hague Blue paint and a patterned wallpaper.

AFTER: We created a moody guest bedroom with Farrow & Ball Hague Blue paint and a patterned wallpaper.

Our client’s favorite room is possibly this moody guest bedroom with elephant motif wallpaper. The contrast of the blue and yellow makes the furnishings pop, and this is a great example of how dark colors don’t make rooms feel depressing or small!

Learn more about the project in the recent Domino Magazine feature!

Which room transformation was your favorite? Tell us in the comments below!